About Partnering

What is a Partnership?

A public-private partnership (PPP) under Feed the Future is a collaboration between public (us) and private (you) sectors that involves a commitment of resources from both sides and jointly addresses business and development objectives. A partnership is designed to create shared value, which is the practice of creating economic value in a way that also benefits society by addressing its needs as well.

Through a joint development venture in an area pertinent to food security, Feed the Future and your business (plus other partners, if applicable) create a public good, such as improved irrigation, seed research, advanced communications, or post-harvest market access, that helps transform the agriculture sector in a developing country or region. The partnership simultaneously helps move your business forward. Through collaboration, we can have a greater impact on your bottom line and our development goals than if we worked alone.

That being said, our resources are limited, so we can’t partner with everyone. Instead, we utilize public resources to support partnership ideas that have the greatest impact on advancing our development goals. For Feed the Future, that means reducing poverty, hunger and undernutrition in our focus countries and ensuring benefit for smallholder farmers, particularly women. 

Learn more about the initiative on our About page.

Who is Feed the Future?

As a whole-of-government initiative, Feed the Future leverages the strengths of agencies across the U.S. Government. Feed the Future capitalizes on the resources and expertise of:

Use our Opportunity Explorer: Private Sector Engagement tool to explore partnership opportunities, share your ideas with us, and get connected to the right people to address your interest.

Partnerships in Action: USAID’s Global Development Alliance Model  

Within our development strategies, Feed the Future pairs what we bring to the table with your financial and technical resources to build a project and provide support for entrepreneurs to operate that project in a developing country. We co-design, co-fund and co-implement the project, sharing the risks, responsibilities and results.

Feed the Future aims to build long-term food security and stimulate broad-based, long-lasting economic growth, which host countries ultimately own and lead.

Global Development Alliances (GDAs) are USAID’s premiere model for public-private partnerships,including in the agriculture sector, helping to improve the social and economic conditions in developing countries and deepen USAID’s development impact. Feed the Future is working through USAID in partnership with both global and local private sector organizations to increase our reach and effectiveness.

How the GDA Model Works

GDAs combine the assets and experiences of the private sector – corporations, foundations, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), universities, local businesses and diaspora groups – leveraging their capital and investments, creativity and access to markets to solve complex problems facing governments, businesses, and communities.

More than just philanthropy or corporate social responsibility, GDAs leverage market-based solutions to advance broader development objectives. When successful, the resulting alliances are both sustainable and have greater impact. GDAs are co-designed, co-funded, and co-managed by all partners involved, so that the risks, responsibilities, and rewards of partnership are shared. They work best and have the greatest development impact when private sector business interests intersect with USAID’s strategic development objectives.  

Visit our Get Started section for information on additional partnership models.

Benefits of Partnering

Successful public-private partnerships that create shared value are mutually beneficial relationships: You further your business goals while helping us transform economies to reduce poverty, hunger and undernutrition. We both bring unique core capacities that benefit our joint work.

What does the U.S. Government bring to a partnership?

  • Access to country partners and other relationships
  • Matching funds and technical assistance
  • Connections across federal agencies
  • Broader access to credit
  • Power to convene
  • Cultural experience and expertise
  • ...

What does the U.S. Government bring to a partnership?

  • Access to country partners and other relationships
  • Matching funds and technical assistance
  • Connections across federal agencies
  • Broader access to credit
  • Power to convene
  • Cultural experience and expertise
  • Technical and regional expertise
  • Rigorous and sophisticated monitoring and evaluation
  • Risk mitigation and due diligence
  • Capacity building
  • Programming that is gender-equitable and environmentally conscious

What do private sector partners bring to a partnership?

  • Bottom-line mentality and efficient use of resources
  • Expertise, experience, services and products
  • Innovative capital structure
  • Technological innovation and intellectual property
  • Commercial supply chain access and expertise...

What do private sector partners bring to a partnership?

  • Bottom-line mentality and efficient use of resources
  • Expertise, experience, services and products
  • Innovative capital structure
  • Technological innovation and intellectual property
  • Commercial supply chain access and expertise
  • Reductions in post-harvest losses
  • Training that builds skills and capacity
  • Marketing and communications expertise
  • Focused leadership
  • Cash and in-kind resources