Kenyan Youth Poised to Feed the Future through Banana Micro-Processing

November 16, 2012
USAID/KenyaMembers of the Nyangorora Banana Processing Group washing, peeling and then slicing bananas for processing.

As climate change makes traditional crops like potatoes or maize more difficult to produce, the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) estimates that bananas may become an increasingly important food source in Kenya.

Looking ahead to an evolving agricultural market, an entrepreneurial group of youth in Kenya’s high-altitude Kisii County is investing in value-added banana processing and tissue culture technology, positioning them to meet a potential increase in demand for this crop. 

The Nyangorora Banana Processing Group, a youth-owned company, is receiving assistance and technical support from Feed the Future to expand banana micro-processing activities and boost the incomes of Kisii’s banana farmers and the community as a whole. The group is specializing in the production of banana flour as well as banana pastries and bread.

“[Feed the Future] has trained us to look at this business as a commercial venture. We’re now establishing formal operational systems to increase efficiency and capitalize on returns,” says Jared Omiso, chairman of the group.

Through Feed the Future, the youth participating in this venture will also receive capacity building on new technology, group governance and management, production operations, financial growth and efficiency. 

Did you know that USAID recently released a new Policy on Youth in Development? As part of this policy, USAID will mainstream youth participation in Feed the Future and other Presidential initiatives. Learn more.